Monthly News Article for June 2022

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

By Sarah Supahan, Superintendent of Schools

Suggested Title: A home library and just six minutes of reading a day

In a recent study it was found that a child growing up in a home with at least 80 books will have greater literacy and number sense in adulthood. In addition, a home library can promote reading and math skills more than college alone. The study, which surveyed 160,000 people, found that just having 80 or more books in a home results in adults with significantly higher levels of literacy, number sense, and communication skills.

The effect was seen in children from homes whose families attained a high-school-level of education. Those children became just as successful in reading, math and communiation skills as university graduates who grew up with only a few books. Since the report found that university graduates who grew up with hardly any books around them had only average literacy levels, having books around the house is an excellent investment in a child's future. The impacts are equivalent to having additional years of education.

The study's conclusions should be heartening to families around the world unable to provide higher education for their children. Having books around the house can substantially level the playing field in reading and math skills even without the expense of college. For those who can send their kids to college, the study suggests that raising a child in a bookish atmosphere may help to get the full benefit of a college education, and it provides a child with an even greater chance of success in adulthood.

This summer, if you can’t afford to buy new books, utilize the public library or talk to your child’s teacher about the possibility of checking books out over the break. Also, look for “little free libraries” or try second hand stores. While most reading experts suggest at least 20 minutes of reading per day as the ideal, all it takes is as little as six minutes of reading a day to make a struggling reader into a proficient one, according to other research. Being a proficient reader positively affects many aspects of education and success in life in general.

Make books and reading a priority this summer. Have children read before they are allowed to utilize devices each day. Make it fun! Take a family trip to the library to check out books (Hayfork, Trinity Center, Weaverville and Willow Creek all have libraries – check their open hours online). Attend story time at the library. Set aside a family reading time each day where everyone reads at the same time (only 6 to 20 minutes is needed out of your busy schedules) or read a short book out-loud before bed (no matter how old they are). Read it by flashlight. Read a book out loud together outside under the stars, or host a summer reading backyard book party. Trade books with friends. Kids can read to a pet animal, especially books about pets. Take turns reading to each other, or have a reading-and-treat time after dinner for dessert, where everyone is allowed to read at the table. Have other friends or families join you in encouraging home libraries and reading this summer!

Monthly News Article for May

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

By Sarah Supahan, Superintendent of Schools

Clutter and Mess Increases Stress

Did you know your cluttered home, office or classroom may be having an adverse affect on health?

Clutter can play a significant role in how we feel about our homes, our workplaces, our classrooms and ourselves. Messy spaces can leave us feeling anxious, helpless, and overwhelmed. Yet, rarely is clutter recognized as a significant source of stress in our lives. That direct link between excess clutter and higher stress levels has been made in numerous studies.

Findings from UCLA researchers showed that those who had an increased level of clutter in their environment also had higher levels of a stress hormone known as cortisol. Clutter can also bombard our minds with too much stimulation, causing our senses to work overtime. Clutter distracts us by drawing our attention away from what our focus should be on.

A study conducted by Princeton University Neuroscience researchers confirms that a cluttered environment impedes the ability to focus. When children or adults have a hard time focusing, mental faculties get worn down and frustration ensues, causing stress. Struggling to focus properly also inhibits the ability to be creative and to problem solve. It’s therefore more difficult for students to complete their school work either in school or at home. Scrubbing, dusting, vacuuming, and organizing don't just make our spaces look better, the act of cleaning and de-cluttering, along with its end results, has a positive impact on mental health.

If cleaning and de-cluttering can be more appealing, a person is more likely to do it. Try these tips:

  • Set a timer. Set aside a specific amount of time to make organizing and/or cleaning more manageable. Taking just 15 or 30 minutes to tidy up can make a difference.
  • Get everyone, especially children, to pitch in. It's easier to tackle bigger projects when you get others involved — and the whole process takes less time.
  • Make it fun. Clean with fun music, incorporate some silly dancing, or make it a competitive event.

And consider these other suggestions:

  • Buy less. Really evaluate the necessity of a purchase and weigh the pros and cons of how much it will enrich your life, your children, or your student’s lives.
  • Eliminate non-essential belongings. Even if the minimalist lifestyle isn’t for you, it isn’t difficult to live with fewer things. Just about all of us own many things that get little to no use. Throw away, donate or recycle them and clutter will be more manageable.
  • Use smart storage solutions. Investing in smart ways to improve storage and organization isn’t included in the “buying less” category because of the long-term benefits they can provide. Try to make storage "closed" spaces, such as in drawers and cabinets. Storing things on open shelves or on top of your desk does not remove the visual stimulation that creates stress.
  • Maintain your clean space. Closed storage solutions do make it easier to keep the indoor environment clean and organized, but there is still a need to maintain the clean space. Be sure everyone puts things away once they are done with them in the dedicated storage area.

Monthly News Article for April 2022

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

By Sarah Supahan, Superintendent of Schools

Creating a healthy sports environment

Nearly everyone with a child in sports has seen that parent or has been that parent who starts screaming from the bleachers at coaches, umpires, and players at a questionable call, a missed ball or a cheap hit. For many, the outburst is isolated, but others yell and complain all nine innings, four quarters or two halves, making life on the field, dugout and bleachers miserable for everyone.

Read more: Monthly News Article for April 2022

Monthly News Article for March 2022

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

By Sarah Supahan, Superintendent of Schools

Parents, online dangers exist but the Internet can be used safely by children with protections in place. One of the most important things to do is to talk openly with them about their online activity and keep those conversations going. Keep screens and devices where you can see them. Place computers in a central spot in the home where you can easily watch the screen. Limit the use of devices using parental controls. Limit or don’t allow children to use devices in their rooms, especially at bedtime. Children should never have unlimited access to the Internet nor unlimited time on devices.

Read more: Monthly News Article for March 2022

Monthly News Article for Februrary 2022

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

‘What is ’normal’ when it comes to speech?'

As we enter the second half of the school year, we wanted to take a moment to look at what appropriate language looks like in young children. In this article we will take a look at what is considered typical language development and give you some strategies to support your child if they are having challenges.  

Read more: Monthly News Article for Februrary 2022

Monthly News Article for January 2022

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

by Fabio Robles, Deputy Superintendent at TCOE

A New School-Based Program for Young Children Coming Soon!

California schools will soon be offering “universal prekindergarten” (UPK) for all four-year-old children, and will be expanding services for three-year-old children through the UPK and the “universal transitional kindergarten” (UTK) program. This will be offered to all 3-year-old children whose 4th birthday occurs by September 1st of that school year. Full realization of this program will be by the 2025-2026 school year, four (school) years away.

Read more: Monthly News Article for January 2022

Monthly News Article for December 2021

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Trinity County Office of Education
Sarah Supahan – County Superintendent of Schools
www.tcoek12.org • (530) 623-2861

 

by Sarah Supahan

With the latest school shooting, it’s likely that the issue of school safety is once again on everyone’s mind. Everytown for Gun Safety (everytownresearch.org) reports 144 incidents of gunfire on school grounds so far this year, resulting in 28 deaths and 86 injuries nationally. There were only 10 recorded shootings in 2020. The vast majority of school shootings occur on K-12 campuses (63.2%) as opposed to colleges and universities (36.6%) or daycare (.2%). And 58% of the shooters are associated with the school, such as current or former students.

Read more: Monthly News Article for December 2021

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